Finding a College Program for Students with Autism

logo_ian Students with intellectual disabilities can receive U.S. federal grants to attend approved programs at one of 30  colleges and universities, including big names such as Clemson, University of California, and Vanderbilt. Read more about college resources for students with intellectual disabilities on the Interactive Autism Network website.

 


Another resource for families of children with disabilities

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Center for Parent Information and Resources

The Center for Parent Information and Resources (CPIR) serves as a central resource of information and products to the community of Parent Training Information (PTI) Centers and the Community Parent Resource Centers (CPRCs), so that they can focus their efforts on serving families of children with disabilities.

 


Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised with Follow-Up (M-CHAT-R/F)

The journal PEDIATRICS has just published an article on the validation of the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers, Revised with Follow-Up (M-CHAT-R/F).

The M-CHAT-R/F (Robins, Fein, & Barton, 2009) is a 2-stage parent-report screening tool to assess risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder in toddlers. It can be administered and scored as part of a well-child care visit, and also can be used by specialists or other professionals to assess risk for ASD.

Professionals using the 2-stage screener can be confident that most screen-positive cases warrant evaluation and referral for early intervention. Widespread implementation of universal screening can lower the age of ASD diagnosis by 2 years compared with recent surveillance findings, increasing time available for early intervention.

It is strongly recommended that users switch to this new version of M-CHAT-R/F. It is available for free download for clinical, research, and educational purposes here.


ADHD Parents Medication Guide

ADHD Med Guide

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) has published a newly revised medication guide for parents on treating Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD).

Updates to the guide include the addition of new research about children with ADHD in school, the transition of adolescents with ADHD into college and adulthood, and more effective treatments.

“We hope this Guide will aid families to better understand the advances being made in ADHD and its treatment, and to serve as a useful tool for clinicians caring for individuals with this disorder,” said Theodore Petti, M.D., medication guide workgroup chair.

To download the pdf of the ADHD Parents Medication Guide click here (45 pp).


Raffle items for the 2nd Annual Devereux Family Resilience Conference

Logo - Attainment CompanyThank you to the Attainment Company as they have has graciously provided a variety of items to be raffled off as part of Saturday’s conference including a suite of products designed to assist families affected by autism and a book on writing measureable IEP goals and objectives.


October is Learning Disabilities Awareness Month

October is Learning Disabilities Awareness Month. In recognition of this we are asked to teach one person something new about learning disabilities.

Two great websites to visit for more information on Learning Disabilities are LD OnLine and Reading Rockets

Also this month the National Center for Learning Disabilities is sponsoring a contest for parents.  To enter the contest parent’s are asked to share a 6-Word Parent Story.

NCLD will select the best submission on October 22 and the winner will receive an LD prize pack. NCLD Prize Pack


DS-Connect™: The Down Syndrome Registry

The NIH has established a new Down syndrome patient registry that will facilitate contacts and information sharing among families, patients, researchers and parent groups.

DS-Connect™ will allow people with Down syndrome or their family members to enter contact information and health history in an online, secure, confidential database.  Registry participants will be able to customize their profile, update it online, and choose which information they would like to display, including reminders about their own medical care and general information about Down syndrome.  They also will be able to compare their own medical information to that of other registrants in a confidential and anonymous manner.

If a participant gives permission to be contacted, clinicians and researchers who are authorized to access the database will be able to contact these individuals to see if they are interested in participating in a research study.

“The new registry provides an important resource to individuals with Down syndrome and their families,” said Yvonne T. Maddox, deputy director of the NIH’s Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), which is funding the registry.  “The registry links those seeking volunteers for their research studies with those who most stand to benefit from the research.”

To read more about or register with this confidential database visit DS-Connect™.


Keeping Students with Disabilities Safe from Bullying

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According to the U.S. Department of Education severe bullying of a student with disabilities could deny that student’s right to a free, appropriate public education and would need to be addressed under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act.  Bullying not only threatens a student’s physical and emotional safety at school, but fosters a climate of fear and disrespect, creating conditions that negatively impact learning— undermining students’ ability to achieve to their full potential. Unfortunately, children with disabilities are disproportionately affected by bullying.

On August 20th, the U.S. Department of Education sent a guidance letter to educators, districts, states, building administrators and other stakeholders on the matter of bullying of students with disabilities. This guidance provided an overview of school districts’ responsibilities to ensure that students with disabilities who are subject to bullying continue to receive free appropriate public education (FAPE) under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and offered information on effective evidence-based practices for preventing and addressing bullying.


Robert Naseef, Ph.D. will be the keynote speaker for Devereux’s 2nd Annual Family Resilience Conference

IMG_4216_edited_smRobert Naseef, Ph.D. is a psychologist and father of an adult son with autism.  His newest book released this year, Autism in the Family: Caring and Coping Together includes advance praise from Temple Grandin, “Fathers often have difficulty expressing their feelings, and this book should be required reading for all fathers who have a child with a disability.” Read a sample chapter on autism and fatherhood from this book.

Dr. Naseef is also the author of the book, Special Children, Challenged Parents: The Struggles and Rewards of Parenting a Child with a Disability which has received international recognition.  He has lectured internationally and appeared on radio and television. He is the co-editor of Voices from the Spectrum: Parents, Grandparents, Siblings, People with Autism, and Professionals Share Their WisdomLiving Along the Autism Spectrum (2009) is a DVD which features him along with Stephen Shore and Dan Gottlieb.

In 2008, he was honored by “Variety, the Children’s Charity” for his outstanding contributions to the autism community. You can visit him on the web at www.alternativechoices.com


The Top 10 iPad Apps for Special Education

With nearly a million apps in the iTunes App Store, identifying effective apps is often an overwhelming task for educators. Teachers from the Children’s Institute (TCI) in Verona, NJ, a school devoted to children with autism and related special needs, have reviewed hundreds of apps to rate their appropriateness for their students. Check out their list of top 10 iPad apps for special education.


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