Early Education Twitter Chat about Family Engagement in Libraries with MomsRising

Twitter Chat about Family Engagement in Libraries

Join #EarlyEdChat on October 19th @2pmET w/ @MomsRising & @GlobalFRP to talk about Family Engagement in Libraries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Brighter futures for anxious kids

Psychologists are homing in on the best ways to treat and prevent the most common mental health disorder among children and adolescents. Check out the article about anxiety disorders in children in the American Psychological Association’s March issue of Monitor.


Parity Complaint Registry and Appeal Resource website launched

The Kennedy Forum has launched the Parity Complaint Registry to track, study and report on how insurance companies are making adverse determinations against people with mental health or addiction issues.

Health insurance carriers are supposed to provide coverage for mental health and substance use disorders that is equal to the kind of coverage that is offered for medical/surgical benefits, especially in regard to financial requirements and treatment limitations.

The Parity Complaint Registry will record and document complaints of people who were denied their rights to equal coverage by insurers who are evading the consumer protections intended by federal parity law.

The Resources Page of the Parity Complaint Registry website also provides information to help consumers who want to file a complaint or appeal with their health plan or State regulatory agency.

 


10 year girl Kaylee Rodgers from Ireland singing ‘Hallelujah’

10 year old Kaylee Rodgers who has autism and ADHD has wowed the world with her rendition of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah”. The video of Kaylee singing with the Killard House Special School’s choir has gone viral. Colin Millar, the school’s headteacher, told BBC News that Kaylee is often shy but when she sings, she just opens up. Check out the video:

Killard House Special School choir singing Hallelujah


Federal Government seeks public comment regarding home and community-based services provided to Medicaid beneficiaries

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is asking the public to comment on reforms and policy options they think the government should consider in order to improve and accelerate the provision of home and community-based services (HCBS) to Medicaid beneficiaries. To read more about it this Request for Information (RFI) or to submit a formal comment visit the Federal Register website at www.federalregister.gov.

To be assured consideration, comments must be received no later than 5 p.m. on January 9, 2017.


Giving adults with autism the skills to build independent lives | PBS NewsHour

Before Josh, 36, arrived at First Place Transition Academy, he had never taken public transportation on his own, much less held down a paying job. But a new pilot program is empowering adults with autism to overcome hurdles to independence. Special correspondent John Donvan, co-author with Caren Zucker of “In a Different Key: The Story of Autism,” reports from Phoenix.

Source: Giving adults with autism the skills to build independent lives | PBS NewsHour

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“Healthier Me” App for Children with Autism by Children’s Specialized Hospital

Children’s Specialized Hospital has launched Healthier Me – the first and only mobile app which promotes health, nutrition, fitness, and safety for children and teens with autism. This free iOS app is available in the Apple store.


No Spanking, No Time-Out, No Problems

A child psychologist argues punishment is a waste of time when trying to eliminate problem behavior. The Atlantic interviews Alan Kazdin, director of the Yale Parenting Center who believes parents should positively reinforce the behavior they do want to see until the negative behavior eventually goes away. Check out the The Atlantic article, “No Spanking, No Time-Out, No Problems” to read more about his methods.


Natural Resilience May Not Be As Common As Once Thought

When someone goes through a rough period, say a divorce or losing a job, the common thought has been that this is a test of the person’s ability to bounce back — and most psychological studies have supported the idea of a person’s innate resilience to the struggles of life.

The common mantra has been “Give the person time to heal,” meaning that those who struggled were oftentimes left to deal with their situation on their own.

But now, new research from Arizona State University finds that natural resilience may not be as common as once thought and that when confronted with a major life-altering event, many people can struggle considerably and for longer periods of time.


Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck

Imbeciles: The Supreme Court, American Eugenics, and the Sterilization of Carrie Buck a new book by Adam Cohen has just been published.

In 1927, the U.S. Supreme Court decided, by a vote of 8 to 1, to uphold a state’s right to forcibly sterilize a person considered unfit to procreate. The case, known as Buck v. Bell, centered on a young woman named Carrie Buck, whom the state of Virginia had deemed to be “feebleminded.”

Author Adam Cohen tells Fresh Air’s Terry Gross that Buck v. Bell was considered a victory for America’s eugenics movement, an early 20th century school of thought that emphasized biological determinism and actively sought to “breed out” traits that were considered undesirable. Continue reading or listen to the story on the NPR website. See: “The Supreme Court Ruling That Led To 70,000 Forced Sterilizations“.