10 year girl Kaylee Rodgers from Ireland singing ‘Hallelujah’

10 year old Kaylee Rodgers who has autism and ADHD has wowed the world with her rendition of Leonard Cohen’s “Hallelujah”. The video of Kaylee singing with the Killard House Special School’s choir has gone viral. Colin Millar, the school’s headteacher, told BBC News that Kaylee is often shy but when she sings, she just opens up. Check out the video:

Killard House Special School choir singing Hallelujah


Giving adults with autism the skills to build independent lives | PBS NewsHour

Before Josh, 36, arrived at First Place Transition Academy, he had never taken public transportation on his own, much less held down a paying job. But a new pilot program is empowering adults with autism to overcome hurdles to independence. Special correspondent John Donvan, co-author with Caren Zucker of “In a Different Key: The Story of Autism,” reports from Phoenix.

Source: Giving adults with autism the skills to build independent lives | PBS NewsHour

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Registration is Open!

Autism A-Z: Beyond the Puzzle Conference on September 30, 2016

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What ‘Finding Dory’ Taught Me as Someone on the Autism Spectrum

Check out Erin Clemen’s blog post over at The Mighty website:  What ‘Finding Dory’ Taught Me as Someone on the Autism Spectrum.


“Healthier Me” App for Children with Autism by Children’s Specialized Hospital

Children’s Specialized Hospital has launched Healthier Me – the first and only mobile app which promotes health, nutrition, fitness, and safety for children and teens with autism. This free iOS app is available in the Apple store.


Autism Speaks Walk Philadelphia Date Announced

autism-speaks-walk-2016-logo-hp3The Autism Speaks Walk for Philadelphia
will be
Saturday, October 22, 2016
at
Citizens Bank Park
Help spread the word!
For more details visit their website.


For parents of autistic children, more social support means better health

Chronic caregiving stress has also been associated with poorer physical health — more pain, more disruptions from physical-health problems and lower overall health-related quality of life.

One powerful way to reduce their stress: social support. That’s according to a new study published in the journal Family Relations by researchers in Canada.

The study provides additional evidence of the importance of both formal and informal social support for the parents of children with autism. You can read more about the results of this new research on the Concordia University website.

 


Special Supplement to Pediatrics Focuses on the Care and Treatment of Youth with Autism

The February issue of Pediatrics includes a special supplement featuring federally supported, collaborative research on the health care and medical treatment of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental disorders. Released by the Autism Intervention Research Network on Physical Health (AIR-P) and Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network (ATN), the supplement, “Health Care for Children and Youth with Autism and other Neurodevelopmental Disorders,” reports on a broad array of findings by network investigators, as well as other research supported by the U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau.

The compendium also includes practice guidelines addressing anxiety treatment and studies on access to diagnosis of ASD, creating autism-specific care plans in hospitals, evaluation of emergency department care for children with ASD, transition services for youth with ASD and co-occurring symptoms such as depression, sleep, irritability and behavior problems.

Daniel Coury, MD is the co-author of six of the articles in this special supplement.

Dr. Coury is Professor of Pediatrics and Psychiatry in the College of Medicine at The Ohio State University. He also serves as chief of the Section of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics for Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and as the Medical Director of AIR-P and ATN.

Dr. Coury will be offering a workshop on the medical management of individuals with Autism Spectrum at an upcoming Autism conference that is being sponsored by Devereux in partnership with Autsim Delaware.

Stay tuned for more details about the upcoming conference, “Autism A-Z: Beyond the Puzzle” scheduled for September 30, 2016.


‘In a Different Key: The Story of Autism,’ by John Donvan and Caren Zucker

‘In a Different Key: The Story of Autism,’ by John Donvan and Caren Zucker is a new book that tells the story of Donald Triplett of Forest, Mississippi who became the first child diagnosed with autism nearly seventy-five years ago.

“Magnificent…Spellbinding—a fable about greed, power and betrayal told through the lens of autism…Chock-full of suspense and hairpin turns…This book does what no other on autism has done: capture all the slippery, bewildering and deceptive aspects…I have been the mother of an autistic son since 1988…I wept and laughed and raged while reading In a Different Key, all the while thinking, Yes! This is my experience, including the raw and dirty parts, but also the wonder and joy.” –Ann Bauer, Washington Post

Read book excerpt here:
http://abcnews.go.com/Health/book-excerpt-key-story-autism-john-donvan-caren/story?id=36317965

‘In a Different Key: The Story of Autism,’ by John Donvan and Caren Zucker
New York Times Sunday Book Review
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/01/31/books/review/in-a-different-key-the-story-of-autism-by-john-donvan-and-caren-zucker.html?_r=0

‘In A Different Key’ Traces History And Politics Of Autism
NPR
http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/01/19/463601735/in-a-different-key-traces-history-and-politics-of-autism


Transition Pathways: A College Program at Drexel University for Individuals with Autism

A $3.5 million grant donated anonymously will allow for the A.J. Drexel Autism Institute at Drexel University to become an innovation incubator for pilot programs to prevent young adults on the spectrum from falling through the cracks after high school.

Named “Transition Pathways,” the demonstration programs will help high school seniors and recent graduates on the cusp of living or working independently.

Read more at: http://drexel.edu/now/archive/2016/February/Pathways_Program